2017 IEEE Conference on Cognitive and Computational Aspects of Situation Management
27-31 March 2017 – Savannah, GA

Program

The Registration Desk is located in the Pulaski Lobby (on the Lobby Level).  It will open for Registration Monday at 0700.

 

Monday 27 March 2017: Tutorials

Session Chair: Galina Rogova

Select “More Tutorial Information” on the right side of this page for tutorial abstracts and instructor information.

 

0800-1200
Tutorial 1
Systems Theoretical Approach to Situation Awareness: Historical and Modern Perspectives
by Dr. Peter Erdi

Room: Pulaski Room (Lobby Level)

Abstract: Perception, comprehension, and projection are the three basic components of situation awareness and management. This tutorial gives a bird’s eye description how early and modern interdisciplinary approaches contributed to the establishment of the theoretical frameworks of perceiving, predicting, controlling complex events. Cybernetics, AI, Cognitive Science and related disciplines are the somewhat tacit precursors of Situation Management and Decision Support.

0800-1200
Tutorial 2
Higher Level Information Fusion for Intelligence Analysis, Decision-making, and Situation Management: Challenges and Computational Approaches
by Drs. James Llinas & Galina Rogova

Room: Chippewa Suite (2nd Floor)

Abstract. Automated Data and Information Fusion (DIF) is fundamentally an estimation process that exploits all available data and information to develop an optimal estimate based largely on minimizing the attendant uncertainty in that estimate. In this tutorial, we develop and argue for a much more expansive approach to systems engineering for DIF systems, discussing the need for overt consideration of those subsequent processes that the DIF estimates typically support, such as intelligence analysis, decision-making, and situational management. We discuss Intelligence Analysis, Decision-Making, Situation Management and Information Fusion; Characterizations of Higher Level Fusion; and Review of Computational Approaches for High-Level Fusion

1300-1700
Tutorial 3
Building Closed-Loop Human Performance Improvement Systems: Keeping Autonomy in Mind
by Drs. Bart Russell & Bill Casebeer

Room: Pulaski Room (Lobby Level)

Abstract: Realizing the benefits of Undersecretary of Defense Bob Work’s “third offset strategy” requires designing, developing and deploying systems that enable humans and their machine teammates to work together more effectively as a team. At Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories, our Human Systems and Autonomy Research Area has focused on leveraging a “sense,” “assess,” and “augment” paradigm to think about human-machine teaming. In this workshop, we will describe several projects we have accomplished or are accomplishing which assist with performance improvement, and focus in particular on the use of electro-encephalograms as a signal which can be used to improve execution of shared human-machine team tasks.

1300-1700
Tutorial 4
“Are you Sure?” Uncertainty in Textual Information in Situation Understanding
by Dr. Kellyn Rein

Room: Chippewa Suite (2nd Floor)

Abstract. Computer-based situation understanding relies on algorithms for text analytics to identify and extract various kinds of pertinent, new actionable information from natural language sources such as reports, blogs, social media and other forms of communication. However, extraction of text elements from their contexts basically overlooks one important facet of human communication: not all that is written is fact. Much is speculation, hearsay, assumption, or even discussion of events which have not happened yet (and which may not happen). Ignoring this comes with a cost — treating all extracted information as fact is dangerous. However, buried in sentences are lexical and grammatical structures that indicate the uncertainty of the propositions. Such elements include hedges such as modal adverbs and adjectives, as well as hearsay markers, indicators of inference or belief (”mindsay”), and verb forms which indicate possible future actions. In this tutorial, we look at how analysis of these lexical and grammatical forms of uncertainty can provide a way to determine an evidential weight for the proposition, enabling us to automatically make an assessment about the credibility of information extracted from English text.

1800-2100
Welcome
Networking Reception
The Welcome Networking Reception is sponsored by Lockheed Martin

Room: Harborview on the 15th Floor

  • Light Dinner buffet will be served (menus available in menu link on the right side of this page). Please remember to bring your complimentary beverage ticket.

 

Tuesday 28 March 2017

Speaker abstracts and information can be found on the right side of this page by selecting “More Speaker Information”

0700-0800 Breakfast Complimentary Breakfast Buffet

Room: Madison Ballroom (Lobby Level)

0800-0945
Keynote Presentation

Session Chair: Odd Erik Gundersen

Dr. Kris Hammond
“Communicating with the New Machine: Human Insight at Machine Scale”

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

Abstract: The world of Big Data is at an inflection point. We now have well understood methods for metering, monitoring, gathering and analyzing massive data sets in business, government, public policy and our day-to-day lives. Mechanisms for large-scale analysis of the data sets we now control can discover powerful correlations, historical trends and operational predications. All of this has been achieved through exceptional technical developments in scale and analytics. More recently, the rise of machine learning has given us even greater power to mine our data for information. But this is not the end of the game. In fact, it is only the first step in making these insights available and useful to the decision makers who need them.In this talk, I will outline how the technology of automatic narrative generation from data plays the crucial role of bridging the gap between the Big Data world of facts and figures and the still unmet need for understandable insights. I will dive into use cases from business, education and the still untapped world of social media and show how the power of automatically generated narratives can provide us all with the evidence and articulation of the insights that are still trapped in the massive data repositories we now control.

0945-1015  Break Coffee Break: Beverages will be served
1015-1200
Oral
Session 1

Session Chair: Steve Dorton

Session Title: Dealing with Situations

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

Presentation 1: “A Framework for Cognitive Situation Control” Gabriel Jakobson (CyberGem Consulting)

Presentation 2: “A Model Based on Rough Sets for Situation Comprehension and Projection”
Giuseppe D’Aniello (University of Salerno, Italy); Angelo Gaeta (Università di Salerno, Italy); Vincenzo Loia (University of Salerno, Italy); Francesco Orciuoli (Università di Salerno, Italy)

Presentation 3: “Situation-Based Ontologies for a Computational Framework for Identity Focusing on Crime Scenes”
Marguerite McDaniel (North Carolina A&T State University, USA); Emma Sloan (Brown University, USA); Siobahn Day, James Mayes, Kaushik Roy, William Nick and Albert Esterline (North Carolina A&T State University, USA)

Presentation 4: “A Cognitively Motivated Algorithm for Rapid Response in Emergency Situations”” Robert Kozma (U of Memphis, USA), presented by Peter Erdi

Presentation 5: “Electroencephalography (EEG) Classification of Cognitive Tasks Based on Task Engagement Index” Joseph Nuamah (North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, USA); Younho Seong (North Carolina A&T State University, USA)

1200-1330 Lunch On Your Own
1330-1515
Panel

Session Chair: Mica Endsley

SA and Big Data:

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

Data analytic methods provide the potential to significantly speed and improve the quality of analysis of large volumes of data. This panel will explore the advent of big data and its use to improve situation awareness via information gathering and prioritization, integration and analysis, and projection of future trends. Technical issues associated with the development of effective big data applications will be explored by the panel, including its affect on understanding certainty or confidence in the underlying data or big data products, validation of big data algorithms, support for situation awareness in working with big data systems, and integration of big data with human decision making. This panel is applicable to work in multiple domains including military and commercial systems and will include a consideration of both technical and cognitive engineering issues.

Panelists:
  • Mica Endsley (SA Technologies)
  • Chris Oster (DARPA)
  • Tom McDermott (Georgia Tech)
  • Dave Gunning (DARPA)
1515-1545 Break  Coffee Break: Beverages will be served

Room: Pulaski Lobby

1545-1730
Oral
Session 2

Session Chair: John Pecarina

Session Title: Dealing with Complex Environments

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

Presentation 1: “Maritime Smuggling Detection and Mitigation Using Risk-Aware Hybrid Robotic Sensor Networks”Nicolas Primeau (University of Ottawa, Canada); Rami Abielmona and Rafael Falcon (Larus Technologies Corporation, Canada); Emil M. Petriu (University of Ottawa, Canada)

Presentation 2: “Soft-Data-Driven Resource Management for Concurrent Maritime Security Operations” Alex Plachkov (University of Ottawa, Canada); Rami Abielmona, Moufid Harb and Rafael Falcon (Larus Technologies Corporation, Canada); Diana Inkpen, Voicu Groza and Emil M. Petriu (University of Ottawa, Canada)

Presentation 3: “Image Retrieval for Visual Understanding in Dynamic and Sensor Rich Environments” Noah Lesch, John Pecarina and Andrew Compton (Air Force Institute of Technology, USA)

Presentation 4: “Overcoming Challenges to Air Force Satellite Ground Control Automation” Michael Bentley (Air Force Institute of Technology & US Air Force, USA); Alan Lin and Douglas Hodson (Air Force Institute of Technology, USA)

 

Wednesday 29 March 2017

Speaker abstracts and information can be found on the right side of this page by selecting “More Speaker Information”

0700-0800 Breakfast Complimentary Breakfast Buffet

Room: Madison Ballroom (Lobby Level)

0800-0945
Keynote Presentation

Session Chair: Scott Fouse

Dr. Doug Riecken
“Minsky K-line Memory: Integration of Multi-Strategy Reasoning and Learning”

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

Abstract: Theories and architectures that consider human/machine processing grounded on multi-strategy reasoning and learning investigate an essential set of questions in “machine intelligence” (biological and/or “silicon”).

You don’t understand anything until you learn it more than one way.”  — Marvin Minsky

There are opportunities in the theories of Minsky and others (e.g., Newell, Schank, LeCun, Mitchell and many others).  I will consider how Minsky’s K-Line Theory of Memory highlights valuable open questions that have impact on our future work.
As a simple starting point for my talk consider the following excerpt from Minsky’s K-Line paper:

When you “get an idea,” or “solve a problem,” or have a “memorable experience,’’ you create what we shall call a K-line. This K-line gets connected to those “mental agencies” that were actively involved in the memorable mental event. When that K-line is later “activated,” it reactivates some of those mental agencies, creating a “partial mental state” resembling the original.

Minsky’s Society of Mind (SOM) theories mixed with contributions from Minsky colleagues provide insight for future research.

0945-1015 Break  Coffee Break: Beverages will be served

Room: Pulaski Lobby

1015-1200
Poster
Session 1

Session Chairs: Kristin Schaefer-Lay and Michael Jenkins

 

Room: Ossabaw Room (Lobby Level)

  1. “Towards a Connected Bicycle to Communicate with Vehicles and Infrastructure: Multimodal Alerting Interface with Networked Short-Range Transmissions (MAIN-ST)” Michael P Jenkins, Daniel J Duggan, III and Alessandro Negri (Charles River Analytics, USA)
  2. “Hailing a Ride with a Rescue Helicopter: A Case Study” Odd Erik Gundersen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway); Christoffer Pram (NTNU, Norway); Fredrik Øvergård (Råd AS, Norway)
  3. “The System Dynamics Architecture of UTASiMo: A Simulation-based Task Analysis Tool to Predict Human Error Probability” Anastasia Angelopoulou (University of Central Florida & Institute for Simulation and Training, USA); Konstantinos Mykoniatis (University of Central Florida, USA)
  4. “Automation Bias with a Conversational Interface” Erin Zaroukian, Jonathan Bakdash (US Army Research Laboratory, USA); Alun Preece (Crime and Security Research Institute, United Kingdom); Will Webberley (Cardiff University, United Kingdom)
  5. “A Vision for Human-Machine Mutual Understanding (HMMU), Trust Establishment, and Collaboration” Carlos R. B. Azevedo, Klaus Raizer and Ricardo Souza (Ericsson Research, Brazil)
  6. “Human Performance Effects of Interactive Machine Learning on Supervising Autonomy” Robert Gutzwiller and John Reeder (Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, USA)
  7. “Information Transfer within Human Robot Teams: Multimodal Attention Management in Human-Robot Interaction” Bruce Mortimer (Engineering Acoustics, Inc., USA); Linda Elliott (US Army Research Laboratory & Human Research and Engineering Directorate, USA)
  8. “Cybersecurity Issues in Robotics” George Clark, Jr., Mike Doran and Todd R Andel (University of South Alabama, USA)

** Numbers represent the poster panel number where posters will be hung during this session

1200-1330 Lunch On Your Own
1330-1515
Poster
Session 2

Session Chairs: Kristin Schaefer-Lay and Michael Jenkins

 

Room: Ossabaw Room (Lobby Level)

  1. “The Effect of Automation and Workspace Design on Humans’ Ability to Recognize Patterns in Data while Fusing Information” Kellie Turner (Air Force Research Laboratory, USA); Michael E. Miller (Air Force Institute of Technology, USA)
  2. “Understanding Audio Communication Delay in Distributed Team Interaction: Impact on Trust, Shared Understanding, and Workload”  Andrea Krausman (US Army Research Laboratory, USA)
  3. “Cognitive Support During High-Consequence Episodes of Care in Cardiovascular Surgery” Heather Conboy (University of Massachusetts); Stefan Christov (Quinnipiac University, USA); George Avrunin (University of Massachusetts, USA); Lori Clarke (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA); Leon Osterweil (University of Massachusetts, USA); Julian Goldman (Mass. General Hospital and CIMIT, USA); Steven Yule (Brigham and Women’s Hospital, USA); Marco Zenati (Harvard Medical School & Brigham & Women’s Hospital, USA)
  4. “Scenarios Using Situation Awareness in Simulation Environments for Eliciting Insider Threat Behavior” Lauren Reinerman-Jones (University of Central Florida & IEMS, USA); Gerald Matthews and Ryan Wohleber (University of Central Florida, USA); Eric Ortiz (SoarTech, USA)
  5. “Designing a Pragmatic Graphical Grammar” Leonard Eusebi, Sean Guarino (Charles River Analytics, USA)
  6. “Testing the Usability of a Decision Support System for Increasing Environmental Awareness”
    Jennifer Danczyk, Paula Jacobs Michael P Jenkins, and Michael Farry (Charles River Analytics, USA); Olivia Montgomery (Tufts University, USA); David Young (Charles River Analytics, USA)
  7. “A Systematic Approach to Developing near Real-Time Performance Predictions based on Physiological Measures” Amanda Kraft (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Lab, USA); Jon Russo (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories, USA); Michael Krein (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Lab, USA); William Casebeer (Advanced Technology Laboratories & Lockheed Martin, USA); Matthias Ziegler (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Lab, USA)

** Numbers represent the poster panel number where posters will be hung during this session

1515-1545 Break  Coffee Break: Beverages will be served

Room: Pulaski Lobby

1545-1730
Oral
Session 3

Session Chair: Christian Lebiere

Session Title: Decision Making & Support

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

Presentation 1: “Self-Adaptive Dynamic Decision Making Processes” Kenneth P. Baclawski (Northeastern University, USA); Adel Ghoneimy, Dieter Gawlick and Eric Chan (Oracle, USA); Kenny Gross (Oracle Physical Sciences Research Center, USA); Zhen Liu (Oracle, USA)

Presentation 2: “Decision-Making Involving Low Probability High Consequence Events Under Risk and Uncertainty” Roman Ilin (AFRL, USA); Galina L. Rogova (University at Buffalo, USA)

Presentation 3: “Online Learning for an Individualized Lane-Change Situation Recognition System Applied to Driving Assistance” Arezoo Sarkheyli (North Rhine-Westphalia, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany); Dirk Söffker (University Duisburg-Essen, Germany)

Presentation 4: “Expert-based Probabilistic Modeling of Workflows in Context of Surgical Interventions” Patrick Philipp (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany); Yvonne Fischer and Jürgen Beyerer (Fraunhofer IOSB, Germany); Jürgen Beyerer (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany)

1800-2100
Banquet
Dinner
Dinner Speaker: Dave Gunning (DARPA)
“The Creation of Siri”‘

Room: Sapelo Room (Lobby Level)

Abstract: Siri was a product of DAPRA’s Personalized Assistant the Learns (PAL) project. In particular, it originated in SRI International’s effort under PAL, called the Cognitive Assistant that Learns and Organizes (CALO). In this talk, David Gunning (who was the DARPA Program Manager for PAL) will describe Siri’s history – how the technology was created, formed into a startup, and acquired by Apple. He will summarize the history of the PAL program, highlighting the key events relevant to the creation of Siri, and summarize the sequence of events, following the PAL program, to create the Siri venture and have it acquired by Apple

*Plated dinner will be served (menus available in menu link on the right side of this page).

Technological Demonstration and Information Tables will be available during both Poster Sessions
  • Lockheed Martin
  • Charles River Analytics
  • SoarTech
  • Sonalysts
  • Budapest Semester in Cognitive Science: A study abroad program
  • Institute for Creative Technologies
  • and more…

Thursday 30 March 2017

Speaker abstracts and information can be found on the right side of this page by selecting “More Speaker Information”

0700-0800 Breakfast Complimentary Breakfast Buffet

Room: Pulaski Foyer

0800-0945
Keynote Presentation

Session Chair: Mica Endsley

Dr. John D. Lee
“Trusting Increasingly Autonomous Cars”

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

Abstract: Increasingly autonomous cars are transforming what it means to drive, and this transformation is emblematic of changes in other domains: finance, military operations, healthcare, manufacturing, and the home. Driving is a microcosm of autonomy. As in other domains, technology does not substitute for people, but transforms their roles. Increasingly these roles are not as a supervisor of automation, but as a partner in a network of interacting agents. This role suggests a need to re-think the concepts of trust and situation awareness. Most generally, this means considering people’s world view and their assumptions regarding the persistence of the natural and moral order that guides the evolution of trust and situation awareness. More specifically, rather than focusing on how automation reliability influences reliance, it may be more productive to focus on how automation collegiality influences cooperation. To promote appropriate trust we need to move beyond creating transparent automation that displays its purpose, process, performance to creating responsive and responsible automation that has controls for aligning its goals, adapting its strategies, and adjusting it behavior. The dimensions of autonomy most relevant for these considerations might not be levels of automation, but depth and breath of span of the control and time constant of interaction. This talk will link these theoretical considerations to research directions and design principles.

0945-1015 Break  Coffee Break: Beverages will be served
1015-1200
Oral
Session 4

Session Chair: Kristin Schaefer-Lay

Session Title: Human-Machine Interaction

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

Presentation 1: “Rightward Attentional Bias in Windshield Displays: Implication Towards External HMIs for Self-driving Cars”
Qiang Liu (VWGoA, USA); Birte Emmermann, Oscar Suen, Bryan Grant, Jacob Hercules and Erik Glaser (ERL VWGoA, USA); Brian Lathrop (Volkswagen Group of America, Inc., USA)

Presentation 2: “Cyber-Physical-Human System for Connected Car-Based e-Tourism: Approach and Case Study Scenario”
Nikolay Shilov and Alexander Smirnov (SPIIRAS, Russia); Oleg Gusikhin (Ford, USA)

Presentation 3: “Head Gesture Recognition via DTW and Threshold Optimization” Ubeyde Mavuş and Volkan Sezer (Istanbul Technical University, Turkey)

Presentation 4: “KIDS Supervisory Control Loop with MSET Prognostics for Human-in-the-Loop Decision Support and Control Applications” Kenneth P. Baclawski (Northeastern University, USA); Adel Ghoneimy, Dieter Gawlick and Eric Chan (Oracle, USA); Kenny Gross (Oracle Physical Sciences Research Center, USA); Zhen Liu (Oracle, USA)

1200-1330 Lunch On Your Own
1330-1515
Panel Presentation

Session Chair: Christian Lebiere

SA & Robotics:

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

The panel on SA and Robotics is concerned with situation awareness and management issues involved in human-robot interaction. Those systems can range in complexity from a human operator controlling a single robot or a swarm of robots through a traditional interface, to teams of humans and robots freely interacting using natural means such as voice and gestures. Issues include techniques to maintain appropriate human SA given existing sensors and cognitive limitations, algorithms to allocate decision making between human oversight and robotic autonomy, and frameworks to manage collaboration in order to leverage respective strengths of humans and robots. The panel will start with an invited presentation, followed by brief rejoinders by the panel members, then an open discussion involving audience participants.

Panelists:
  • Matt Johnson (IHMC)
  • Scott Grigsby (SoarTech)
  • Florian Jentsch (University of Central Florida)
  • Volkan Ustun (USC Institute for Creative Technologies)
1515-1545 Break  Coffee Break: Beverages will be served
1545-1730
Oral
Session 5

Session Chair: Tom Ziemke

Session Title: Interaction with Autonomous Systems

Room: Pulaski (Lobby Level)

Presentation 1: “Effective Variety? for Whom (Or What)?”
Stephen Dorton (Sonalysts, Inc., USA); Micah Thirey (Sonalysts, USA)

Presentation 2: “Evaluating Path Planning in Human-Robot Teams: Quantifying Path Agreement and Mental Model Congruency” Brandon Perelman (US Army Research Laboratory, USA); Shane Mueller (Michigan Technological University, USA); and Kristin Schaefer (US Army Research Laboratory, USA)

Presentation 3: “Using Context and Robot-Human Communication to Resolve Unexpected Situational Conflicts” Wayne Zachary and Taylor Carpenter (CHI Systems, USA)

 

 

 

Friday 31 March 2017

0800-1100 Planning 2018
Please consider joining us for the 2018 planning meeting. This is a great way to get involved, be a part of the program formulation, or volunteer to be part of the program organization committee. Please contact us at cogsima@gmail.com if you are interested in participating in this session. There will be limited seats available. Breakfast will be provided.